Skip to content

Archive for

Stretch the Soul and the benefits of yoga

by Amanda DeGasperis and Stephanie DeGasperis – CAMH Foundation supporters, and organizers of “Stretch the Soul,” an annual yoga event in support of CAMH.

Room full of people doing yoga, warrior pose

A great turnout at our third annual Stretch the Soul fundraiser in support of CAMH

Whether you are an expert at downward dog or a novice learning how to establish a stable butterfly pose, yoga is good for the mind and great for the soul.

On July 13, we were inspired by the incredible show of support for CAMH and mental health when 80 participants came out for a day of yoga at the third annual “Stretch the Soul” event in support of CAMH.

When we started the event, our mission was to raise awareness and end stigma towards mental illness, and we’re happy to say that it continues each year.

Like millions of people around the world, we have been deeply touched by mental illness. Change is within our grasp and we wanted to make a difference with an event to support the incredible work being done at CAMH.

If you couldn’t make it out to our day of yoga, there are many ways you can keep healthy and happy this summer and throughout the year. Read more

Q&A: Getting to know CAMH’s ethicist, Kevin Reel

by Joan Chang

CAMH ethicist Kevin Reel

Ethicist Kevin Reel

Q: What’s a health care ethicist?

A: What we do in the practice of healthcare ethics is help people think through really challenging decisions and situations and figure out what causes that sense of ‘yuck’ that we feel when ethical values are in conflict – our own, or each other’s.

The more official term for the ‘yuck’ factor is moral distress, but ‘yuck’ really tells it the way it is. The problem with the ‘yuck’ feeling is that it’s not always reliable. We may not feel it at all when we should, or the ‘yuck’ might be more emotional than ethical.

Ethical decisions are essentially about trying to figure what is the ‘good’ or ‘right’ thing to do in a situation. Such situations occur every day, and often go unnoticed because they are pretty straightforward. But sometimes they are much more complex.

Thinking through them can be much easier when an objective person helps you. The ethicist can be that objective person – part of, and familiar with, CAMH, but not in the middle of the situation. Read more

Survey: What do people think of our tobacco free policy?

by Lilian Riad-Allen

In the cigar shop that doubled as a convenience store by my first residence in university, I remember the old cigarette ads plastered across the wall: Doctors in white coats promoting their favourite brand of cigarettes, children and even babies in cigarette ads, and women talking about the weight loss benefits of smoking.

I was always intrigued by these images as they seemed to reflect a reality that I couldn’t imagine. Attitudes had shifted so much since then that the idea of a physician advocating for tobacco use seemed almost satirical.

Attitudes have indeed been shifting. Since the first US surgeon general’s report in 1964[1] , the number of people smoking has been in constant decline to where we are now, 50 years later, with approximately 17 per cent of Canadians still smoking.

When you compare that to the number of people with mental health and addiction issues who smoke, you see a striking difference – with an estimated smoking prevalence of over 60 per cent. Read more

Police and the mental health system: An opportunity for positive social change

Polic encounters with people in crisis - text from report cover

I’m publicly supporting Justice Frank Iacobucci’s report to the Toronto Police Service (TPS), Police Encounters with People in Crisis (pdf).

It’s an important step toward changing the way society thinks about, and responds to, people with mental illness.

I’m honoured to serve on the advisory committee that will assist the TPS to implement the report’s recommendations.

Jennifer Chambers of CAMH’s Empowerment Council played a prominent advocacy role in the lead-up to the report. She is so right when she says that one of the best ways to address prejudice against a group is to give them a voice and it’s very gratifying to see that people with lived experience of mental illness will be members of the implementation committee.

The tragic death of teenager Sammy Yatim last year led to this report. I share Justice Iacobucci’s view that balance is necessary in addressing the gaps brought to light by this tragedy. Read more

What can we do to stop physician burnout in Canada?

by Stephen Kish

We all know about the long wait times when we visit family doctors in Canada.

This is a special problem in psychiatry as most psychiatric help is provided by these first line treatment providers.

Now we are told that physician “burnout” (exhaustion, cynicism, and low professional accomplishment) will only make matters worse and the lines longer.

Carolyn Dewa, who heads the CAMH Centre for Research on Employment and Workplace Mental Health, and Dr. Philip Jacobs from the Institute of Health Economics in Alberta recently published an estimate in BMC Health Services Research of the percentage of physicians in Canada who are suffering from burnout and the consequences associated with this stress.

Read more